Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (Cancer Treatment and Research)

The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew and act anew. Abraham Lincoln, 1862 When I came across this quote, it made me recall my first participation at an international meeting on bone marrow transplantation, at a time when this was the only term that was used to describe the field. During a particular session there was a presentation on the use of peripheral blood as the sole source of stem cells for transplantation, and a member of the audience rose to state that it was medically unethical to consider such treatment, as it certainly could not contain stem cells. Now nearly twenty years later, peripheral blood is the predominant source of stem cells used for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In the same period of time there have been several other dogmatic opinions, which permeate all of medicine, that have come and gone in the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and will continue to do so with advancements from basic and clinical research. It is within this context that the format of this book was devised. Traditionally reviews on specific topics related to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation reflect the views of a single author or a research group.

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What the Church Teaches: Human Stem Cell Research and Cloning

Stem cell research has been promoted by scientiests, doctors, and the media as one of the most important types of research today. It offers the promise of treating some of the most devastating diseases and injuries, including diabetes, leukemia, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease, and brain and spinal cord injuries.

What the Church Teaches: Human Stem Cell Research and Cloning explains:

  • What are stem cells?
  • Is all stem cell research wrong?
  • What are the moral concerns with embryonic stem cell research?
  • What are the medical concerns with embryonic stem cell research?
  • Are there alternatives to using embryonic stem cells for research?
  • What is the current state of government involvement?
  • What does the Church teach on this issue?
  • Why should Catholics be concerned?
  • What is cloning?

This is a pamphlet everyone should read.

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Stem Cells: Basics and Clinical Translation (Translational Medicine Research)

This book provides a comprehensive review of the properties of various stem cell types, the mechanisms of their behaviors and their potential clinical application. Stem cells have a great capacity of self-renewal and differentiation. They represent new paradigms for disease treatment in the field of regenerative medicine since the day they were discovered. As stem cell research is complicated and making progress rapidly, it is important to have expertise in this field to share their views and perspectives. This book provides a wonderful platform for those who are interested in stem cells to learn from and communicate with experts. Particularly, it highlights the roles of stem cell based therapy for a variety of diseases. Furthermore, this book gives a detailed introduction to the great works related to stem cells in China. The readers could gain a profound knowledge of the state-of-art research done by scientists in the field of stem cells. Overall, this book will be a valuable reference resource for both experienced investigators pursuing stem cell research as well as those are just entering into this field.

Dr. Robert Chunhua Zhao, a Cheung Kong Professor of Stem Cell Biology, is Professor of Cell Biology at the Institute of Basic Medical Sciences & School of Basic Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), Beijing, China. He is Director of the Center for Tissue Engineering, PUMC and Chief Scientist of the National Basic Research Program of China (“973 Program”). He also serves as Regional Editor of Stem Cells and Development.

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