Stem Cell Research and the Collaborative Regulation of Innovation (Biomedical Law and Ethics Library)

Hopes are high that stem cell (SC) research will lead to treatments and cures for some of the most serious diseases affecting humankind today. SC science has been used in a treatment setting in the replacement of patients’ windpipes and in restoring sight to patients who were blind in one eye and in future it is hoped that when the body is injured it will be able to be stimulated to produce those types of SCs necessary to repair the particular damage caused. In the meantime, research into specific treatments for a wide range of serious conditions is being undertaken including Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, and diabetes.

The book considers the regulatory governance of stem cell research, setting out a readily understandable account of the science and the challenges it poses for regulators as the research is increasingly being clinically applied. It provides a critical account of those elements of a regulatory system which will be required for any jurisdiction aiming to facilitate innovative and productive SC research while maintaining appropriate ethical and legal controls. The book addresses the specific failings in the current regulatory approach to SC research in the UK and goes on to look at the regulatory approaches in the US.

The book systematically analyses the roles and responsibilities of the three key participants who collaborate in this process: regulators, scientists and tissue providers, arguing that a regulatory system which fails to recognise and facilitate the vital role which each of these three groups plays runs the risk of impairing the chances of the hopes for SC research being realised. The book places a particular emphasis on ensuring that those who contribute their bodily tissues to this endeavour are treated fairly, involving a recognition that their tissues are their property.

Product Features

  • Used Book in Good Condition

Visit the website for more information…

Stem Cell Genetics for Biomedical Research: Past, Present, and Future

This book looks at where stem cell technology is presently and how it is instrumental in advancing the field of disease modeling and cell transplantation. By focusing on major human disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, and heart disorders, the book summarizes the major findings in the field of human stem cells and dissect the current limitations on our understanding of stem cells biology. The chapters focus on the genetics, genomics, epigenetics and physiology of stem cells models, together with technological advances on molecular biology such as CRISPR/Cas9 or epigenetic editing, that will be instrumental in the future of human disease modeling and treatment. 

In base of the limitations of current disease models and in front of the unmet necessity of finding therapeutical interventions for human disorders, the availability of stem cell technology has opened new doors for several fields. The unlimited self-renewal capacity and more extensive differentiation potential of stem cells offers a theoretically inexhaustible and replenishable source of any cell subtype. Since Professor Shinya Yamanaka described it, 10 years ago in his seminal paper, that somatic cells could be reprogrammed to inducible stem cells (iPSC) just by expressing four transcription factors, the field of has exploded, especially its applications in biomedical research.

Visit the website for more information…

A Manual for Differentiation of Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells to Specific Cell Types (Manuals in Biomedical Research – Volume 8)

This is the first experimental protocol book that covers the differentiation of bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) into specific cell types, targeted at the undergraduate and graduate student level. The 19 chapters deal with the differentiation methods using small molecules, cytokines and polymeric scaffolds.

BMSCs are pluripotential in that they not only act as myelo-regenerative and supportive cells, but can also differentiate into almost any kind of cells in our body. In addition, when implanted in vivo, they could help repair multiple tissues such as blood vessels, heart, liver and so on.

For the differentiation of BMSCs, many methods have been introduced to adjust their microenvironment (chemical and physical cues), including chemical induction methods using large or small molecules and pellet culture; mechanical stimulation induction methods using cyclic mechano-transduction or ultrasonication; cytokine-released method using scaffolds; and so on.

Readership: Undergraduate and graduate students and researchers in biomedical engineering, tissue engineering, stem cell research, nanotechnology and material science.

Visit the website for more information…