Stem Cell Genetics for Biomedical Research: Past, Present, and Future

This book looks at where stem cell technology is presently and how it is instrumental in advancing the field of disease modeling and cell transplantation. By focusing on major human disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, and heart disorders, the book summarizes the major findings in the field of human stem cells and dissect the current limitations on our understanding of stem cells biology. The chapters focus on the genetics, genomics, epigenetics and physiology of stem cells models, together with technological advances on molecular biology such as CRISPR/Cas9 or epigenetic editing, that will be instrumental in the future of human disease modeling and treatment. 

In base of the limitations of current disease models and in front of the unmet necessity of finding therapeutical interventions for human disorders, the availability of stem cell technology has opened new doors for several fields. The unlimited self-renewal capacity and more extensive differentiation potential of stem cells offers a theoretically inexhaustible and replenishable source of any cell subtype. Since Professor Shinya Yamanaka described it, 10 years ago in his seminal paper, that somatic cells could be reprogrammed to inducible stem cells (iPSC) just by expressing four transcription factors, the field of has exploded, especially its applications in biomedical research.

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A Manual for Differentiation of Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells to Specific Cell Types (Manuals in Biomedical Research – Volume 8)

This is the first experimental protocol book that covers the differentiation of bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) into specific cell types, targeted at the undergraduate and graduate student level. The 19 chapters deal with the differentiation methods using small molecules, cytokines and polymeric scaffolds.

BMSCs are pluripotential in that they not only act as myelo-regenerative and supportive cells, but can also differentiate into almost any kind of cells in our body. In addition, when implanted in vivo, they could help repair multiple tissues such as blood vessels, heart, liver and so on.

For the differentiation of BMSCs, many methods have been introduced to adjust their microenvironment (chemical and physical cues), including chemical induction methods using large or small molecules and pellet culture; mechanical stimulation induction methods using cyclic mechano-transduction or ultrasonication; cytokine-released method using scaffolds; and so on.

Readership: Undergraduate and graduate students and researchers in biomedical engineering, tissue engineering, stem cell research, nanotechnology and material science.

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The Umbilical Cord Blood Controversies in Medical Law (Biomedical Law and Ethics Library)

Since the therapeutic value of umbilical cord blood (UCB) stem cells was first recognised in the late 1980s, there has been a proliferation of both public and private UCB banks worldwide. However, the ability to utilise such a potentially value resource has provoked a number of controversies. In a distinctly accessible style, this book unpacks the socio-legal implications of the UCB collection process and constructs a detailed analysis of the law and ethics that surrounds UCB banking in the UK, including ownership of the cells. Its enquiry is located within the theoretical framework of altruism versus self-interest and explores the notions of risk and choice associated with this distinctive blend of public/private healthcare provision. The book evaluates the impact of the Human Tissue Act 2004 and the European Tissues and Cells Directive (2004/23/EC) on the UCB industry and provides a unique insight into the effect that the law may have on the NHS whose maternity staff and premises are used to collect UCB. This book would be of interest primarily to a UK readership in addition to expectant families, health professionals, students, academics, practitioners and the UCB industry elsewhere in the world.

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